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November 2020

Monday, 30 November 2020 00:00

Why Diabetes Make Wounds Heal Slower

Did you know that approximately 30 million people in the United States live with diabetes? One frequent side effect of this condition is the development of wounds on the feet, known as diabetic foot wounds (DFUs). DFUs are slow to heal, do not heal well, and sometimes don’t heal at all. This increases the risk of getting an infection, which can come with a host of serious complications. But what is it about diabetes that makes DFUs heal so poorly? When blood glucose levels are permanently high, as they often are in people with diabetes, the function of white blood cells is impaired. Without the white blood cells working correctly, the body has more trouble closing wounds. Poor circulation, a frequent complication of diabetes, makes blood move more slowly. The blood becomes unable to supply nutrients to the wound efficiently, leading to poorer healing and a loss of feeling in the feet. Because of this, a person might get a cut or sore on their foot and not even be aware of it, delaying treatment and increasing infection risk. If you have diabetes, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for the appropriate foot care to prevent and treat DFUs.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Harris L. Klear from Burlington County Podiatry Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlton and Delran, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Saturday, 28 November 2020 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 23 November 2020 00:00

Ways to Diagnose an Ankle Sprain

An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments that connect the bones of the leg to the foot. These ligaments are important, as they help keep the ankle bones in position as well as the ankle joint stable. This type of injury generally happens when you accidentally twist or turn your ankle in an awkward way. A podiatrist can diagnose an ankle sprain by performing a thorough physical examination of the affected foot and ankle. This includes touching the skin around the injury to check for areas of tenderness, and moving the foot to check the range of motion Sometimes, imaging scans may be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out other possibilities, such as a broken bone. Examples of imaging scans that a podiatrist may use include X-rays, MRIs, CT scans, or ultrasounds. For more information about ankle sprains, please consult with a podiatrist. 

 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Harris L. Klear from Burlington County Podiatry Associates. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlton and Delran, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
Monday, 16 November 2020 00:00

What Can Cause Sesamoiditis?

The sesamoid bones are located under the joints of the big toe. They are small, about the size of a pea, and are found within the soft tissues. Their function is to absorb pressure while standing and walking, in addition to easing friction as the big toe is moved. The medical condition that is known as sesamoiditis can occur when the sesamoid bones become inflamed. This can happen from practicing repetitive movements such as running and dancing. Additionally, sesamoiditis may occur due to existing conditions such as arthritis, stress fractures, or high arches. Mild relief may be found when protective pads are worn, which may help to cushion the sesamoid bones. If you have developed sesamoiditis, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Dr. Harris L. Klear of Burlington County Podiatry Associates. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlton and Delran, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis
Monday, 09 November 2020 00:00

An Overview of Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a deformity of the toes in which they bend downward at the joint in a claw-like position. This can cause pain and difficulty walking. Hammertoe is often the result of wearing shoes that are too small, tight, or narrow. To prevent this condition, you should wear shoes that fit properly, have a wide toe box, and do not have very high heels. There are many different treatments for hammertoe, including wearing soft insoles in your shoes or doing exercises to stretch and strengthen the toes. When left untreated, hammertoe can become progressively worse until you are unable to straighten the toes. In these cases, surgery to correct this deformity may be an option. If you have hammertoe, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist, who can find the right treatment for you. 

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Dr. Harris L. Klear from Burlington County Podiatry Associates. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Marlton and Delran, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Hammertoe
Monday, 02 November 2020 00:00

What Is Claudication?

Peripheral artery disease (PAD), a condition characterized by poor circulation to the lower extremities, often has no symptoms. However, when symptoms do become apparent, the first one is usually intermittent claudication. Claudication is a painful type of cramping that occurs in the hips, thighs, or calves when you are walking, climbing the stairs, or exercising. This cramping is caused by too little blood flowing to the lower limbs, and typically goes away when you are at rest. Other symptoms of PAD can include leg pain, poorly healing foot wounds, a decrease in the temperature of your legs compared to the rest of the body, and poor nail and hair growth on the legs. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist, who can screen you for PAD.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Harris L. Klear from Burlington County Podiatry Associates. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Marlton and Delran, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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